Azienda Agricola San Bartolomeo

ORGANIC EGGS

We raise three different breeds of free-range hens. The Marans (France), white Livornese and red Livornese (Italy). This diversifies our egg production in terms of their color and their organoleptic properties.
Our hens graze in the wild all day from sunrise to sunset. They can choose the diet that best suits them, thus leading a healthy life according to the criteria of the earth and nature. Layers lay about one egg every two / three days respecting the normal day-night rest cycle. This eliminates any type of productive stress which improves animal care and well-being. It also improves nutritional qualities of the eggs and enhances their flavors.
Have you ever wondered why our eggs have different colors and sizes? The answer is very easy: we raise three different breeds of hens. Each has its own characteristics with their eggs, but they all share the same high nutritional, taste and organoleptic qualities.
Our animals have the opportunity to be scratching outdoors with sunlight every day from sunrise to sunset, and freely feed on wild herbs. The active metabolism of hens combined with their lifestyle and natural diet allows our eggs to have a higher content of vitamins E and D as well as phytosterols (plant sterols that reduce the absorption of cholesterol when taken by humans) , polyunsaturated fatty acids (omega-3) and retinol (vitamin A). This makes our product a precious ally for the health of our consumers. The free-range hens we raise are the Marans, characterized by their brownish red plumage. They are large grazers that produce eggs with a dark and resistant shell. The white Livornesi have a white and very slender plumage, producing eggs with a white and hard shell at an early age with a slightly larger yolk. The red Livornese produce a pink egg. Our hens are given the same diet as our chickens, but mainly they spontaneously feed on grains and worms that they find in the ground during their long walks outdoors. When leading a natural life and not being artificially induced to continuous laying, they produce an average of six eggs per week which will decrease with age, however increasing their size.

Can you drink a raw egg or cook it soft-boiled or is it just a legend told us by our grandparents?
Yes you can!
We always invite our customers and butchers to try our colorful raw eggs within nine days of laying to avoid any natural bacterial proliferation because they have freshness, taste and no strange coloring.

Are eggs bad for your health?
Our hens scratch around outdoors all day, breathe clean air and enjoy the beneficial effects of sunlight during their free walks. They manage to eat about 30 grams of grass and small insects in a day, thus developing an excellent metabolism.
Our organic eggs are rich in proteins and have high biological value, composed of all the amino acids we need. They do not have a high content of saturated fats, but they contain vitamins,
mineral salts and other nutrients important for our health such as retinol ( vitamin A), a nutrient that acts in favor of a good development of the nervous system and optic nerves.

Does the egg yolk have to be a deep red?
Absolutely not!
Unfortunately, this is one of the most widespread myths all over the world thanks also to the erroneous judgment of many chefs perhaps more ready to satisfy the eye than our taste buds, and to the hand of man often ready to add dyes and non-natural foods in the feeding of laying hens to obtain phosphorescent red yolks.
The color of the yolk is in fact determined exclusively by what the hens eat and is mainly linked to the seasonality of the herbs and natural foods that they will find in the pasture. Some carotenes for example, which hens take in high quantities thanks to pasture, give the yolk a typical yellow color (lutein, zeaxanthin) unlike other carotenes which naturally have more orange colors (beta- carotene, cryptoxanthin). Nevertheless they are both carotenes with equal antioxidant action and are very important for human health.

Does the flavor of the egg depend on the color of the shell?
No, it depends on the type of life the hen leads and how much movement it does. Above all it depends on its feeding, in particular on what it ate in the days preceding the laying.

Why is the meat of the thighs redder than the breast?
Our chickens walk tirelessly. They can travel more than 1 mile a day scratching under the olive trees enjoying fresh air and sun at their own will.
In this way they develop long and slender legs, whose flesh remains redder thanks to the development of muscle fibers and the perfect infiltration of fat. A precious energy reserve.
The breast meat, not having the same circulatory stimulus, remains whiter.

How do I know where an egg comes from? What does that abbreviation printed on the shell mean?
It's very simple, each egg has an identity card printed on the shell by law through an alphanumeric code!
It starts with a number that can be from 0 to 3. This indicates the type of farm from which the eggs are derived. "0" means open-air farming and organic production. "1" means open-air farming. "2" means breeding on land. "3" means battery breeding. Following the number is the abbreviation of the State where the egg was produced. "IT" for example indicates Italy. There are three more numbers that indicate the code of the Municipality of production, followed by the abbreviation of the province of production.
The code is completed with three other numbers that actually indicate the name of the farm to have an even more particular and precious detail of the place where the egg was produced.

We raise three different breeds of free-range hens. The Marans (France), white Livornese and red Livornese (Italy). This diversifies our egg production in terms of their color and their organoleptic properties.

Our hens graze in the wild all day from sunrise to sunset. They can choose the diet that best suits them, thus leading a healthy life according to the criteria of the earth and nature. Layers lay about one egg every two / three days respecting the normal day-night rest cycle. This eliminates any type of productive stress which improves animal care and well-being. It also improves nutritional qualities of the eggs and enhances their flavors.

Have you ever wondered why our eggs have different colors and sizes? The answer is very easy: we raise three different breeds of hens. Each has its own characteristics with their eggs, but they all share the same high nutritional, taste and organoleptic qualities.

Our animals have the opportunity to be scratching outdoors with sunlight every day from sunrise to sunset, and freely feed on wild herbs. The active metabolism of hens combined with their lifestyle and natural diet allows our eggs to have a higher content of vitamins E and D as well as phytosterols (plant sterols that reduce the absorption of cholesterol when taken by humans) , polyunsaturated fatty acids (omega-3) and retinol (vitamin A). This makes our product a precious ally for the health of our consumers.
The free-range hens we raise are the Marans, characterized by their brownish red plumage. They are large grazers that produce eggs with a dark and resistant shell. The white Livornesi have a white and very slender plumage, producing eggs with a white and hard shell at an early age with a slightly larger yolk.
The red Livornese produce a pink egg. Our hens are given the same diet as our chickens, but mainly they spontaneously feed on grains and worms that they find in the ground during their long walks outdoors. When leading a natural life and not being artificially induced to continuous laying, they produce an average of six eggs per week which will decrease with age, however increasing their size.

Can you drink a raw egg or cook it soft-boiled or is it just a legend told us by our grandparents?
Yes you can!
We always invite our customers and butchers to try our colorful raw eggs within nine days of laying to avoid any natural bacterial proliferation because they have freshness, taste and no strange coloring.

Are eggs bad for your health?
Our hens scratch around outdoors all day, breathe clean air and enjoy the beneficial effects of sunlight during their free walks. They manage to eat about 30 grams of grass and small insects in a day, thus developing an excellent metabolism.
Our organic eggs are rich in proteins and have high biological value, composed of all the amino acids we need. They do not have a high content of saturated fats, but they contain vitamins,
mineral salts and other nutrients important for our health such as retinol ( vitamin A), a nutrient that acts in favor of a good development of the nervous system and optic nerves.


Does the egg yolk have to be a deep red?

Absolutely not!
Unfortunately, this is one of the most widespread myths all over the world thanks also to the erroneous judgment of many chefs perhaps more ready to satisfy the eye than our taste buds, and to the hand of man often ready to add dyes and non-natural foods in the feeding of laying hens to obtain phosphorescent red yolks.
The color of the yolk is in fact determined exclusively by what the hens eat and is mainly linked to the seasonality of the herbs and natural foods that they will find in the pasture. Some carotenes for example, which hens take in high quantities thanks to pasture, give the yolk a typical yellow color (lutein, zeaxanthin) unlike other carotenes which naturally have more orange colors (beta- carotene, cryptoxanthin). Nevertheless they are both carotenes with equal antioxidant action and are very important for human health.


Does the flavor of the egg depend on the color of the shell?
No, it depends on the type of life the hen leads and how much movement it does. Above all it depends on its feeding, in particular on what it ate in the days preceding the laying.

Why is the meat of the thighs redder than the breast?
Our chickens walk tirelessly. They can travel more than 1 mile a day scratching under the olive trees enjoying fresh air and sun at their own will.
In this way they develop long and slender legs, whose flesh remains redder thanks to the development of muscle fibers and the perfect infiltration of fat. A precious energy reserve.
The breast meat, not having the same circulatory stimulus, remains whiter.

How do I know where an egg comes from? What does that abbreviation printed on the shell mean?
It's very simple, each egg has an identity card printed on the shell by law through an alphanumeric code!
It starts with a number that can be from 0 to 3. This indicates the type of farm from which the eggs are derived. "0" means open-air farming and organic production. "1" means open-air farming. "2" means breeding on land. "3" means battery breeding. Following the number is the abbreviation of the State where the egg was produced. "IT" for example indicates Italy. There are three more numbers that indicate the code of the Municipality of production, followed by the abbreviation of the province of production.
The code is completed with three other numbers that actually indicate the name of the farm to have an even more particular and precious detail of the place where the egg was produced.